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#1: Re: I'm considering being a vegetarian...

Posted on 2006-06-11 00:04:36 by usual suspect

socially retarded Luddite Kevan Smith wrote:

> > Comparably, nuclear power is much cleaner and better for the air and water --
> > you should be glad your grid contains nuclear power plants.
>
> What will be done with all the radioactive waste?

"All" is quantified as how much? What do you do with ALL the pollution from ALL the coal burned at your local plant? You just let it out into the air, and you turn a blind eye to the raped hillsides where your lignite is strip-mined.

A lot of the fuel can be recycled (as it's done in other nations), but we don't do that in the US. Instead, we've set aside land, like Yucca Mountain, to store high level wastes. That land is stable, not near large populations, and the containment of non-recyclable hight level wastes is adequate to prevent it from ever being a problem.

See:
<a href="http://www.nei.org/doc.asp?catnum=1&amp;catid=14" target="_blank">http://www.nei.org/doc.asp?catnum=1&amp;catid=14</a>

Maybe you should learn more about the facts before you start spewing disinformation provided by activists. That goes for your AR crap as well as nuclear power.

&gt; That stuff has the
&gt; capability to kill tens of thousands of years into the future.

It MIGHT have such capability if it were stored out in the open in populated areas. It WON'T be.

&gt; Our government can't even handle a hurricane disaster,

What the hell do you expect any government to do about the fucking weather, you miserable little pansy? The federal government did what it could after the fact to rescue and alleviate the suffering of those too fucking stupid to evacuate when the local government (not to mention the president himself a couple days before Katrina hit) urged citizens to do that. Why do you liberal twits expect the fucking government to hold your hand through every damn aspect of your bumbling pathetic life, including those instances when you leave or even brazenly put yourself in peril?

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#2: Re: I'm considering being a vegetarian...

Posted on 2006-06-11 12:50:37 by pearl

&quot;chico chupacabra&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:support&#64;our.troops" target="_blank">support&#64;our.troops</a>&gt; wrote in message news:<a href="mailto:20060610170449.3672c75c.support&#64;our.troops..." target="_blank">20060610170449.3672c75c.support&#64;our.troops...</a>

Kevan Smith wrote:
&gt;
&gt; &gt; &gt; Comparably, nuclear power is much cleaner and better for the air and water --
&gt; &gt; &gt; you should be glad your grid contains nuclear power plants.
&gt; &gt;
&gt; &gt; What will be done with all the radioactive waste?
....
&gt; A lot of the fuel can be recycled (as it's done in other nations), but we don't do that in the US. Instead, we've set aside land,
like Yucca Mountain, to store high level wastes. That land is stable, not near large populations, and the containment of
non-recyclable hight level wastes is adequate to prevent it from ever being a problem.
....
&gt; &gt; That stuff has the
&gt; &gt; capability to kill tens of thousands of years into the future.
&gt;
&gt; It MIGHT have such capability if it were stored out in the open in populated areas. It WON'T be.

------------------------------------------------------------ ----------------------

'Billions of dollars allotted to . the Department of Energy for
cleaning up nuclear waste sites is now being used to ship nuclear
waste.to munitions manufacturers all over the world to be
&quot;recycled&quot; into weapons.

------------------------------------------------------------ --------------------

The US Department of Defense has more than 1.1 billion pounds
of nuclear waste in storage from 50 years of nuclear weapons
production and nuclear power plants. The government, hemmed
in by public opposition, health and environmental movements, is
always trying to find new &quot;acceptable&quot; ways to dispose of it. It
has apparently found one. Billions of dollars allotted to the
Environmental Restoration branch of the Department of Energy
for cleaning up nuclear waste sites is now being used to ship
nuclear waste free of charge to munitions manufacturers all over
the world to be &quot;recycled&quot; into weapons. .... In introducing the
use of depleted uranium weapons the US government used its
own soldiers as guinea pigs, permanently destroyed the ecology
of the region, and left an ongoing legacy of childhood leukemia,
birth defects and poisoned water for civilians living in the Gulf,
while making low intensity nuclear weapons the necessary norm
for all future conflicts.

------------------------------------------------------------ ------------------

Depleted uranium is a highly toxic and radioactive byproduct of
the uranium enrichment process needed in nuclear reactors and
the manufacture of nuclear weapons. Natural uranium, with a
half-life of 4.5 billion years, is comprised of three isotopes: 99.27%
U238, 0.72% U235, and .0057% U234. DU is uranium with the
U235 isotope-the fissionable material-reduced from 0.7% to
0.2%-thus, &quot;depleted.&quot; (3) The Pentagon says DU is relatively
harmless, emitting &quot;only&quot; 60% the radiation of nondepleted
uranium. But Dr. Ernest Sternglass, Jay Gould, and Benjamin
Goldman have shown that even low-level radiation emitted
during the &quot;normal&quot; functioning of nuclear power plants creates
havoc with people's immune system as well as the surrounding
environment. (4) And, according to independent scientists,
&quot;a DU antitank round outside its metal casing can emit as much
radiation in one hour as 50 chest X-rays.&quot; (5) A tank driver
receives a radiation dose of 0.13 rem/hr to his or her head from
overhead DU armor (6) which may seem like a very low dose.
However, after 32 continuous days, or 64 12-hour days, the
amount of radiation a tank driver receives to his head will
exceed the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's annual standard
for public whole-body exposure to man-made sources of radiation.
(7) Unfortunately, US tank crews were not monitored for radiation
exposure during the Gulf War. (8)

When properly encased, DU gives off very little radiation, the
Pentagon says. But DU becomes much more radioactive when
it burns. And when it is fired, it combusts on impact. &quot;As much
as 70% of the material is released as a radioactive and highly
toxic dust that can be inhaled or ingested and then trapped in
the lungs or kidneys.&quot; (9)

Leaving more than 600,000 pounds of depleted uranium
scattered throughout the region, by (the first Gulf) war's end
the US had turned the Gulf area into a deadly radioactive grid,
affecting not only US soldiers but hundreds of thousands,
perhaps millions, of people who live and work in the Gulf.
A single molecular particle of depleted uranium will subject
an individual to radiation at a level 800 times what is permitted
by federal regulations for external exposure. (10) As DU-artillery
shells heat up, the uranium becomes aerosolized, releasing high
amounts of radioactivity, not the low amounts the military claims
for &quot;normal&quot; depleted uranium. Clouds of deadly uranium
dioxide swept over large areas of Iraq and Kuwait, devastating
agriculture, soil, and water. (11)

Radioactivity inflicts severe damage on the total environment
while weakening immune systems, destroying the kidneys, lungs,
bones, and liver, and rendering the human body susceptible to
all sorts of diseases that a healthy individual might have been
able to ward off. Iraqi children continue to find uranium-coated
shells; they have been coming down with all sorts of deadly
illnesses associated with radiation poisoning. Is it any wonder
that many symptoms of Gulf War Syndrome are so similar to
radiation sickness?
....'
<a href="http://www.greens.org/s-r/15/15-20.html" target="_blank">http://www.greens.org/s-r/15/15-20.html</a>

....

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#3: Re: I'm considering being a vegetarian...

Posted on 2006-06-11 13:22:29 by pearl

&quot;pearl&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:tea&#64;signguestbook.ie" target="_blank">tea&#64;signguestbook.ie</a>&gt; wrote in message news:e6gsb9$hio$<a href="mailto:1&#64;reader01.news.esat.net..." target="_blank">1&#64;reader01.news.esat.net...</a>
&gt; &quot;chico chupacabra&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:support&#64;our.troops" target="_blank">support&#64;our.troops</a>&gt; wrote in message news:<a href="mailto:20060610170449.3672c75c.support&#64;our.troops..." target="_blank">20060610170449.3672c75c.support&#64;our.troops...</a>
&gt;
&gt; Kevan Smith wrote:
&gt; &gt;
&gt; &gt; &gt; &gt; Comparably, nuclear power is much cleaner and better for the air and water --
&gt; &gt; &gt; &gt; you should be glad your grid contains nuclear power plants.
&gt; &gt; &gt;
&gt; &gt; &gt; What will be done with all the radioactive waste?
&gt; ...
&gt; &gt; A lot of the fuel can be recycled (as it's done in other nations), but we don't do that in the US. Instead, we've set aside
land,
&gt; like Yucca Mountain, to store high level wastes. That land is stable, not near large populations, and the containment of
&gt; non-recyclable hight level wastes is adequate to prevent it from ever being a problem.
&gt; ...
&gt; &gt; &gt; That stuff has the
&gt; &gt; &gt; capability to kill tens of thousands of years into the future.
&gt; &gt;
&gt; &gt; It MIGHT have such capability if it were stored out in the open in populated areas. It WON'T be.
&gt;
&gt; ------------------------------------------------------------ ----------------------
&gt;
&gt; 'Billions of dollars allotted to . the Department of Energy for
&gt; cleaning up nuclear waste sites is now being used to ship nuclear
&gt; waste.to munitions manufacturers all over the world to be
&gt; &quot;recycled&quot; into weapons.
&gt;
&gt; ------------------------------------------------------------ --------------------
&gt;
&gt; The US Department of Defense has more than 1.1 billion pounds
&gt; of nuclear waste in storage from 50 years of nuclear weapons
&gt; production and nuclear power plants. The government, hemmed
&gt; in by public opposition, health and environmental movements, is
&gt; always trying to find new &quot;acceptable&quot; ways to dispose of it. It
&gt; has apparently found one. Billions of dollars allotted to the
&gt; Environmental Restoration branch of the Department of Energy
&gt; for cleaning up nuclear waste sites is now being used to ship
&gt; nuclear waste free of charge to munitions manufacturers all over
&gt; the world to be &quot;recycled&quot; into weapons. .... In introducing the
&gt; use of depleted uranium weapons the US government used its
&gt; own soldiers as guinea pigs, permanently destroyed the ecology
&gt; of the region, and left an ongoing legacy of childhood leukemia,
&gt; birth defects and poisoned water for civilians living in the Gulf,
&gt; while making low intensity nuclear weapons the necessary norm
&gt; for all future conflicts.
&gt;
&gt; ------------------------------------------------------------ ------------------
&gt;
&gt; Depleted uranium is a highly toxic and radioactive byproduct of
&gt; the uranium enrichment process needed in nuclear reactors and
&gt; the manufacture of nuclear weapons. Natural uranium, with a
&gt; half-life of 4.5 billion years, is comprised of three isotopes: 99.27%
&gt; U238, 0.72% U235, and .0057% U234. DU is uranium with the
&gt; U235 isotope-the fissionable material-reduced from 0.7% to
&gt; 0.2%-thus, &quot;depleted.&quot; (3) The Pentagon says DU is relatively
&gt; harmless, emitting &quot;only&quot; 60% the radiation of nondepleted
&gt; uranium. But Dr. Ernest Sternglass, Jay Gould, and Benjamin
&gt; Goldman have shown that even low-level radiation emitted
&gt; during the &quot;normal&quot; functioning of nuclear power plants creates
&gt; havoc with people's immune system as well as the surrounding
&gt; environment. (4) And, according to independent scientists,
&gt; &quot;a DU antitank round outside its metal casing can emit as much
&gt; radiation in one hour as 50 chest X-rays.&quot; (5) A tank driver
&gt; receives a radiation dose of 0.13 rem/hr to his or her head from
&gt; overhead DU armor (6) which may seem like a very low dose.
&gt; However, after 32 continuous days, or 64 12-hour days, the
&gt; amount of radiation a tank driver receives to his head will
&gt; exceed the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's annual standard
&gt; for public whole-body exposure to man-made sources of radiation.
&gt; (7) Unfortunately, US tank crews were not monitored for radiation
&gt; exposure during the Gulf War. (8)
&gt;
&gt; When properly encased, DU gives off very little radiation, the
&gt; Pentagon says. But DU becomes much more radioactive when
&gt; it burns. And when it is fired, it combusts on impact. &quot;As much
&gt; as 70% of the material is released as a radioactive and highly
&gt; toxic dust that can be inhaled or ingested and then trapped in
&gt; the lungs or kidneys.&quot; (9)
&gt;
&gt; Leaving more than 600,000 pounds of depleted uranium
&gt; scattered throughout the region, by (the first Gulf) war's end
&gt; the US had turned the Gulf area into a deadly radioactive grid,
&gt; affecting not only US soldiers but hundreds of thousands,
&gt; perhaps millions, of people who live and work in the Gulf.
&gt; A single molecular particle of depleted uranium will subject
&gt; an individual to radiation at a level 800 times what is permitted
&gt; by federal regulations for external exposure. (10) As DU-artillery
&gt; shells heat up, the uranium becomes aerosolized, releasing high
&gt; amounts of radioactivity, not the low amounts the military claims
&gt; for &quot;normal&quot; depleted uranium. Clouds of deadly uranium
&gt; dioxide swept over large areas of Iraq and Kuwait, devastating
&gt; agriculture, soil, and water. (11)
&gt;
&gt; Radioactivity inflicts severe damage on the total environment
&gt; while weakening immune systems, destroying the kidneys, lungs,
&gt; bones, and liver, and rendering the human body susceptible to
&gt; all sorts of diseases that a healthy individual might have been
&gt; able to ward off. Iraqi children continue to find uranium-coated
&gt; shells; they have been coming down with all sorts of deadly
&gt; illnesses associated with radiation poisoning. Is it any wonder
&gt; that many symptoms of Gulf War Syndrome are so similar to
&gt; radiation sickness?
&gt; ...'
&gt; <a href="http://www.greens.org/s-r/15/15-20.html" target="_blank">http://www.greens.org/s-r/15/15-20.html</a>

Sep. 20, 2005

'On another front, In These Times reports that some of the
grunts in Iraq who have come home in one piece are finding
their health isn't as whole as they thought. The piece focuses
on New York National Guardsman Gerard Matthew, who
returned from his Iraq tour a year and a half ago. Once home,
he found out that a fellow soldier, Sgt. Ray Ramos, and a
group of other New York Guard members tested positive
for depleted uranium (DU) contamination -- and so did he.
As a possible result, his 13-month old daughter has a
condition common to those with radioactive exposure: her
right hand has only two fingers.

It turns out that the U.S. military has used more than
1,000 tons of DU weapons in Afghanistan and more than
3,000 tons in Iraq. &quot;The problem is that when DU hits its
target, it burns at a high temperature, throwing off clouds
of microscopic particles that poison a wide area and
remain radioactive for billions of years,&quot; the magazine
reports. &quot;If inhaled, these particles can lodge in lungs,
other organs or bones, irradiating tissue and causing
cancers.&quot; Even though soldiers are facing these risks,
the military is putting off testing soldiers for exposure,
with only 270 returning troops having been tested for
DU so far.
....'
<a href="http://www.cjrdaily.org/magazine_report/back_to_iraq.php" target="_blank">http://www.cjrdaily.org/magazine_report/back_to_iraq.php</a>

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