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#1: Help identifying a black tea

Posted on 2006-07-14 02:43:32 by Konrad

Yesterday, I was having my lunch in a Chinese restaurant that had a
very interesting tea, like nothing I've tried before. It was close to
Pu-erh, but without the earthy flavor. Actually, for some reason, it
reminded me of confectioner sugar.

The owner was busy, so I couldn't keep a conversation, but he said that
the tea was a true black tea from China. Anybody has any idea about
what that thing could be?

Thanks,

--k

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#2: Re: Help identifying a black tea

Posted on 2006-07-14 03:10:57 by samarkand

Hi --k

Chinese agricultural dept sometime back in the 1970s under the new govt
lumped pu'er as black, and most vendors since then have considered in a
twists of definitions, pu'er is black tea and black tea is pu'er.

So when the owner told you it is black tea, he might meant pu'er. Since he
said true black tea, I assume that he meant it as 'not' Pu'er...the black
tea that enjoys almost equal fame as Pu'er amongst chinese immigrants is Liu
Bao, dialectally known as Lok Poh.

This black tea has a nutty and sweet taste to it.

But confirm with the owner again the next time you visit.

Danny


&quot;Konrad Scorciapino&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:scorciapino&#64;gmail.com" target="_blank">scorciapino&#64;gmail.com</a>&gt; wrote in message
news:<a href="mailto:1152837812.741277.123250&#64;75g2000cwc.googlegroups.com..." target="_blank">1152837812.741277.123250&#64;75g2000cwc.googlegroups.com...</a>
&gt; Yesterday, I was having my lunch in a Chinese restaurant that had a
&gt; very interesting tea, like nothing I've tried before. It was close to
&gt; Pu-erh, but without the earthy flavor. Actually, for some reason, it
&gt; reminded me of confectioner sugar.
&gt;
&gt; The owner was busy, so I couldn't keep a conversation, but he said that
&gt; the tea was a true black tea from China. Anybody has any idea about
&gt; what that thing could be?
&gt;
&gt; Thanks,
&gt;
&gt; --k
&gt;

Report this message

#3: Re: Help identifying a black tea

Posted on 2006-07-14 16:35:33 by Space Cowboy

In a previous discussion Seb said =C1=F9=B1=A4 LiuBao is from Guangxi and
=C1=F9=B0=B2 LiuAn is from Anhui and both come in basket form. However I g=
ot
a basket of LiuAn labeled as such that taste sweet and nutty. I have
an older unlabeled LiuAn that just taste nutty. The sweet and nutty
brews black leaf and the older green leaf. Both look like the same
leaf when dry. I would like to find LiuBao also labeled as such.

Jim

samarkand wrote:
&gt; Hi --k
&gt;
&gt; Chinese agricultural dept sometime back in the 1970s under the new govt
&gt; lumped pu'er as black, and most vendors since then have considered in a
&gt; twists of definitions, pu'er is black tea and black tea is pu'er.
&gt;
&gt; So when the owner told you it is black tea, he might meant pu'er. Since =
he
&gt; said true black tea, I assume that he meant it as 'not' Pu'er...the black
&gt; tea that enjoys almost equal fame as Pu'er amongst chinese immigrants is =
Liu
&gt; Bao, dialectally known as Lok Poh.
&gt;
&gt; This black tea has a nutty and sweet taste to it.
&gt;
&gt; But confirm with the owner again the next time you visit.
&gt;
&gt; Danny
&gt;
&gt;
&gt; &quot;Konrad Scorciapino&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:scorciapino&#64;gmail.com" target="_blank">scorciapino&#64;gmail.com</a>&gt; wrote in message
&gt; news:<a href="mailto:1152837812.741277.123250&#64;75g2000cwc.googlegroups.com..." target="_blank">1152837812.741277.123250&#64;75g2000cwc.googlegroups.com...</a>
&gt; &gt; Yesterday, I was having my lunch in a Chinese restaurant that had a
&gt; &gt; very interesting tea, like nothing I've tried before. It was close to
&gt; &gt; Pu-erh, but without the earthy flavor. Actually, for some reason, it
&gt; &gt; reminded me of confectioner sugar.
&gt; &gt;
&gt; &gt; The owner was busy, so I couldn't keep a conversation, but he said that
&gt; &gt; the tea was a true black tea from China. Anybody has any idea about
&gt; &gt; what that thing could be?
&gt; &gt;
&gt; &gt; Thanks,
&gt; &gt;
&gt; &gt; --k

Report this message

#4: Re: Help identifying a black tea

Posted on 2006-07-15 06:49:29 by oleg shteynbuk

Space Cowboy wrote:
&gt; In a previous discussion Seb said Áù±¤ LiuBao is from Guangxi and
&gt; Áù°² LiuAn is from Anhui and both come in basket form.

Recently got 2000 Liu Bao Beeng Cha from Seb(jingteashop) in cake form.

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#5: Re: Help identifying a black tea

Posted on 2006-07-15 09:36:31 by samarkand

&quot;Space Cowboy&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:netstuff&#64;ix.netcom.com" target="_blank">netstuff&#64;ix.netcom.com</a>&gt; wrote in message
news:<a href="mailto:1152887733.847342.304760&#64;s13g2000cwa.googlegroups.com..." target="_blank">1152887733.847342.304760&#64;s13g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...</a>
In a previous discussion Seb said Áù±¤ LiuBao is from Guangxi and
Áù°² LiuAn is from Anhui and both come in basket form. However I got
a basket of LiuAn labeled as such that taste sweet and nutty. I have
an older unlabeled LiuAn that just taste nutty. The sweet and nutty
brews black leaf and the older green leaf. Both look like the same
leaf when dry. I would like to find LiuBao also labeled as such.

Jim

Liu Bao is from Guangxi. Liu An is from Anhui, and in the recent years from
Guangxi as well.

Liu Bao is processed from tea varietals found in Guangxi, fermented first in
loose leaf and then pressed into baskets, sold as loose leaf, or compressed
into cakes as Oleg bought his.

Liu Bao comes in 2 disctinct forms, the small leaf and large leaf varietals.
Basically the taste is similar. The taste is sweet, nutty with a hint of
woodiness.

Liu An is produced in Anhui. Those produced in the city of Liu An is called
Liu An Tea, those produced outside of the city area but in Anhui is called
An Cha, or An Tea.

The varietals for this tea are from the green tea plants in Anhui.

The tea is processed as green tea, and while it is hot, pressed into
baskets, re-steamed and then dried on low heat. This tea is kept for
sometime to allow post fermentation before drinking it.

This tea is virtually not known in China, becuase it is another of the
accidental tea that turned 'black' from transportation to immigrants
overseas - in the old days, the people from Anhui were well known merchants
and traders who travelled throughout the country and overseas. The green
tea they brought along in baskets fermented and create the unique taste they
came to like. Hence Liu An Tea is almost unheard of in China, but the
immigrants in Hongkong, Taiwan and south east Asia are familiar with it.

In the recent years Guangxi factories adapted the methods from Anhui and
produced their own Liu An tea.

Danny

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#6: Re: Help identifying a black tea

Posted on 2006-07-15 11:47:01 by teaismud

I would also suggest Liu An ... if you had a chinese supermarket
anywhere near you you might easily find some too (with all this
admittedly useful and interesting talk about Guangxi etc we wouldn't
want you to get the wrong idea - it's not special or rare)

Im Mr Teas


Konrad Scorciapino wrote:
&gt; Yesterday, I was having my lunch in a Chinese restaurant that had a
&gt; very interesting tea, like nothing I've tried before. It was close to
&gt; Pu-erh, but without the earthy flavor. Actually, for some reason, it
&gt; reminded me of confectioner sugar.
&gt;
&gt; The owner was busy, so I couldn't keep a conversation, but he said that
&gt; the tea was a true black tea from China. Anybody has any idea about
&gt; what that thing could be?
&gt;
&gt; Thanks,
&gt;
&gt; --k

Report this message

#7: Re: Help identifying a black tea

Posted on 2006-07-15 15:00:41 by Space Cowboy

Thanks, Danny. From your explanation I assume a LiuAn taste like
LiuBao if it came from Guangxi and uses the same varietal. My
fermented LiuAn from Anhui and Guangxi don't remind me of fermented
Puer in the slightest. I find of them agreeable in a more oxidized
sense. In another thread LiuAn seems to go downhill as it ages.

Jim

samarkand wrote:
&gt; &quot;Space Cowboy&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:netstuff&#64;ix.netcom.com" target="_blank">netstuff&#64;ix.netcom.com</a>&gt; wrote in message
&gt; news:<a href="mailto:1152887733.847342.304760&#64;s13g2000cwa.googlegroups.com..." target="_blank">1152887733.847342.304760&#64;s13g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...</a>
&gt; In a previous discussion Seb said =C1=F9=B1=A4 LiuBao is from Guangxi and
&gt; =C1=F9=B0=B2 LiuAn is from Anhui and both come in basket form.
..=2E.
&gt; Liu Bao is from Guangxi. Liu An is from Anhui, and in the recent years f=
rom
&gt; Guangxi as well.
..=2E.
&gt; In the recent years Guangxi factories adapted the methods from Anhui and
&gt; produced their own Liu An tea.
&gt;=20
&gt; Danny

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#8: Re: Help identifying a black tea

Posted on 2006-07-15 15:02:23 by Space Cowboy

$5/500g/basket.

Jim

<a href="mailto:teaismud&#64;yahoo.com" target="_blank">teaismud&#64;yahoo.com</a> wrote:
&gt; I would also suggest Liu An ... if you had a chinese supermarket
&gt; anywhere near you you might easily find some too (with all this
&gt; admittedly useful and interesting talk about Guangxi etc we wouldn't
&gt; want you to get the wrong idea - it's not special or rare)
&gt;
&gt; Im Mr Teas

Report this message

#9: Re: Help identifying a black tea

Posted on 2006-07-15 15:31:26 by samarkand

Depending on the leaf used, this might happen, though I have not come across
it.

Basically, Liu An is a green tea turned black, so it might be expected that
it will oxidize and lose its flavours faster.

I forgot to add that Liu Bao is nutty of the betel nut taste, while Liu An
is more like soy bean, pea sort of nutty...

Danny

&quot;Space Cowboy&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:netstuff&#64;ix.netcom.com" target="_blank">netstuff&#64;ix.netcom.com</a>&gt; wrote in message
news:<a href="mailto:1152968441.158719.298250&#64;m79g2000cwm.googlegroups.com..." target="_blank">1152968441.158719.298250&#64;m79g2000cwm.googlegroups.com...</a>
Thanks, Danny. From your explanation I assume a LiuAn taste like
LiuBao if it came from Guangxi and uses the same varietal. My
fermented LiuAn from Anhui and Guangxi don't remind me of fermented
Puer in the slightest. I find of them agreeable in a more oxidized
sense. In another thread LiuAn seems to go downhill as it ages.

Jim

samarkand wrote:
&gt; &quot;Space Cowboy&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:netstuff&#64;ix.netcom.com" target="_blank">netstuff&#64;ix.netcom.com</a>&gt; wrote in message
&gt; news:<a href="mailto:1152887733.847342.304760&#64;s13g2000cwa.googlegroups.com..." target="_blank">1152887733.847342.304760&#64;s13g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...</a>
&gt; In a previous discussion Seb said Áù±¤ LiuBao is from Guangxi and
&gt; Áù°² LiuAn is from Anhui and both come in basket form.
....
&gt; Liu Bao is from Guangxi. Liu An is from Anhui, and in the recent years
&gt; from
&gt; Guangxi as well.
....
&gt; In the recent years Guangxi factories adapted the methods from Anhui and
&gt; produced their own Liu An tea.
&gt;
&gt; Danny

Report this message

#10: Re: Help identifying a black tea

Posted on 2006-07-15 17:06:54 by Space Cowboy

You haven't said. What are the color of the LiuBao spent leaves when
brewed? My one known LiuAn from Anhui are green. My other LiuAn
probably from Guangxi are black. I myself am too nutty to know if
there is a difference in like taste besides the sweetness. I need to
get some LiuBao and go from there. Besides LiuAn has anybody seen
LiuBao in Chinatown?

xi=E8xi=E8,
Jim

samarkand wrote:
&gt; Depending on the leaf used, this might happen, though I have not come acr=
oss
&gt; it.
&gt;
&gt; Basically, Liu An is a green tea turned black, so it might be expected th=
at
&gt; it will oxidize and lose its flavours faster.
&gt;
&gt; I forgot to add that Liu Bao is nutty of the betel nut taste, while Liu An
&gt; is more like soy bean, pea sort of nutty...
&gt;
&gt; Danny
&gt;
&gt; &quot;Space Cowboy&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:netstuff&#64;ix.netcom.com" target="_blank">netstuff&#64;ix.netcom.com</a>&gt; wrote in message
&gt; news:<a href="mailto:1152968441.158719.298250&#64;m79g2000cwm.googlegroups.com..." target="_blank">1152968441.158719.298250&#64;m79g2000cwm.googlegroups.com...</a>
&gt; Thanks, Danny. From your explanation I assume a LiuAn taste like
&gt; LiuBao if it came from Guangxi and uses the same varietal. My
&gt; fermented LiuAn from Anhui and Guangxi don't remind me of fermented
&gt; Puer in the slightest. I find of them agreeable in a more oxidized
&gt; sense. In another thread LiuAn seems to go downhill as it ages.
&gt;
&gt; Jim
&gt;
&gt; samarkand wrote:
&gt; &gt; &quot;Space Cowboy&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:netstuff&#64;ix.netcom.com" target="_blank">netstuff&#64;ix.netcom.com</a>&gt; wrote in message
&gt; &gt; news:<a href="mailto:1152887733.847342.304760&#64;s13g2000cwa.googlegroups.com..." target="_blank">1152887733.847342.304760&#64;s13g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...</a>
&gt; &gt; In a previous discussion Seb said =C1=F9=B1=A4 LiuBao is from Guangxi a=
nd
&gt; &gt; =C1=F9=B0=B2 LiuAn is from Anhui and both come in basket form.
&gt; ...
&gt; &gt; Liu Bao is from Guangxi. Liu An is from Anhui, and in the recent years
&gt; &gt; from
&gt; &gt; Guangxi as well.
&gt; ...
&gt; &gt; In the recent years Guangxi factories adapted the methods from Anhui and
&gt; &gt; produced their own Liu An tea.
&gt; &gt;
&gt; &gt; Danny

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#11: Re: Help identifying a black tea

Posted on 2006-07-15 17:39:06 by Konrad

Thanks for the input!

I went there again, but, unfortunately, the owner could not fully
understand what I was asking. Apparently, the tea is from Taiwan, and
by 'true black tea', he meant that it is not red tea.

I'm confused now. Black tea from Taiwan? I thought Taiwan produced
mainly Oolong. :P

--k

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#12: Re: Help identifying a black tea

Posted on 2006-07-15 21:06:32 by samarkand

If the leaves of the Liu An is green, it might be that the tea is still a
young buck.

Liu An leaves are dark amber to brown, like a raw aged pu'er.

Liu Bao leaves are similar to that of cooked pu'er, most of the times they
don't expand or unfurl.

Danny

&quot;Space Cowboy&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:netstuff&#64;ix.netcom.com" target="_blank">netstuff&#64;ix.netcom.com</a>&gt; wrote in message
news:<a href="mailto:1152976014.753038.31410&#64;m79g2000cwm.googlegroups.com..." target="_blank">1152976014.753038.31410&#64;m79g2000cwm.googlegroups.com...</a>
You haven't said. What are the color of the LiuBao spent leaves when
brewed? My one known LiuAn from Anhui are green. My other LiuAn
probably from Guangxi are black. I myself am too nutty to know if
there is a difference in like taste besides the sweetness. I need to
get some LiuBao and go from there. Besides LiuAn has anybody seen
LiuBao in Chinatown?

xièxiè,
Jim

Report this message

#13: Re: Help identifying a black tea

Posted on 2006-07-15 21:08:22 by samarkand

Anything is possible.

:&quot;)

Danny


&quot;Konrad Scorciapino&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:scorciapino&#64;gmail.com" target="_blank">scorciapino&#64;gmail.com</a>&gt; wrote in message
news:<a href="mailto:1152977946.148980.213740&#64;p79g2000cwp.googlegroups.com..." target="_blank">1152977946.148980.213740&#64;p79g2000cwp.googlegroups.com...</a>
&gt; Thanks for the input!
&gt;
&gt; I went there again, but, unfortunately, the owner could not fully
&gt; understand what I was asking. Apparently, the tea is from Taiwan, and
&gt; by 'true black tea', he meant that it is not red tea.
&gt;
&gt; I'm confused now. Black tea from Taiwan? I thought Taiwan produced
&gt; mainly Oolong. :P
&gt;
&gt; --k
&gt;

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#14: Re: Help identifying a black tea

Posted on 2006-07-17 11:20:11 by Michael Plant

oleg shteynbuktt_tg.21213$<a href="mailto:ci.1610&#64;news-wrt-01.rdc-nyc.rr.com7" target="_blank">ci.1610&#64;news-wrt-01.rdc-nyc.rr.com7</a>/15/06
00:<a href="mailto:49oshteynbuk&#64;nyc.rr.com" target="_blank">49oshteynbuk&#64;nyc.rr.com</a>

&gt; Space Cowboy wrote:
&gt;&gt; In a previous discussion Seb said ?? LiuBao is from Guangxi and
&gt;&gt; ?? LiuAn is from Anhui and both come in basket form.
&gt;
&gt; Recently got 2000 Liu Bao Beeng Cha from Seb(jingteashop) in cake form.

Oleg,
How's it taste? Better yet, bring it along if you
see what I mean. (Thought those little buggers
came in baskets, not beengs.) Bodaboing! Hasta
mañana.
Michael

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