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#1: difference between a fricassee and a blanquette?

Posted on 2005-02-14 22:46:26 by jmeyer

Is there a difference between a fricassee of chicken, and a blanquette
of chicken? Both seem to go something like this:

saute chicken pieces, but don't brown
add flour & cook for a few minutes
add stock & simmer for 30 minutes
strain sauce
reduce
thicken with egg yolks & cream


Josh

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#2: Re: difference between a fricassee and a blanquette?

Posted on 2005-02-15 00:04:03 by Wayne Boatwright

On Mon 14 Feb 2005 02:46:26p, wrote in rec.food.cooking:

>
>
> Is there a difference between a fricassee of chicken, and a blanquette
> of chicken? Both seem to go something like this:
>
> saute chicken pieces, but don't brown
> add flour & cook for a few minutes
> add stock & simmer for 30 minutes
> strain sauce
> reduce
> thicken with egg yolks & cream
>
>
> Josh

A blanquette IS a _white_ fricassee. There is also a _brown_ fricassee.

HTH
Wayne

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#3: Re: difference between a fricassee and a blanquette?

Posted on 2005-02-15 02:07:00 by Sheldon

<a href="mailto:jme...&#64;msg.ucsf.edu" target="_blank">jme...&#64;msg.ucsf.edu</a> wrote:
&gt; Is there a difference between a fricassee of chicken, and a
blanquette
&gt; of chicken?

fricassee
[FRIHK-uh-see]
n=2E A dish of meat (usually chicken) that has been saut=E9ed in butter
before being stewed with vegetables. The end result is a thick, chunky
stew, often flavored with wine. fricassee v. This word is also used as
a verb, as in to &quot;fricassee a chicken.&quot;

- - -

blanquette
[blahn-KEHT]
A rich, creamy stew made with veal, chicken or lamb, button mushrooms
and small white onions. The name comes from the French word blanc ,
meaning &quot;white.&quot;

=A9 Copyright Barron's Educational Services, Inc. 1995 based on THE FOOD
LOVER'S COMPANION, 2nd edition, by Sharon Tyler Herbst.=20
---

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#4: Re: difference between a fricassee and a blanquette?

Posted on 2005-02-15 17:52:16 by Nathalie Chiva

On 14 Feb 2005 13:46:26 -0800, <a href="mailto:jmeyer&#64;msg.ucsf.edu" target="_blank">jmeyer&#64;msg.ucsf.edu</a> wrote:

&gt;
&gt;
&gt;Is there a difference between a fricassee of chicken, and a blanquette
&gt;of chicken? Both seem to go something like this:
&gt;
&gt;saute chicken pieces, but don't brown
&gt;add flour &amp; cook for a few minutes
&gt;add stock &amp; simmer for 30 minutes
&gt;strain sauce
&gt;reduce
&gt;thicken with egg yolks &amp; cream
&gt;

Blanquette meat shouldn't be sauteed first.

Nathalie in Switzerland

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#5: Re: difference between a fricassee and a blanquette?

Posted on 2005-02-15 23:40:29 by azazello

&lt;<a href="mailto:jmeyer&#64;msg.ucsf.edu" target="_blank">jmeyer&#64;msg.ucsf.edu</a>&gt; wrote:

&gt; Is there a difference between a fricassee of chicken, and a blanquette
&gt; of chicken?

In modern culinary practice, often none. Traditionally, though,
fricassée pieces were first cooked in fat (usually butter), somewhat
browning them, if only very lightly, and then cooked in white sauce,
whereas blanquette pieces were initially cooked in stock, before white
roux was added and the sauce was made. At least this is my
understanding...

Victor

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#6: Re: difference between a fricassee and a blanquette?

Posted on 2005-02-16 18:52:15 by Peter Horsman

I think the main difference is the way the chicken is cut;
Fricassee is cut into strips.
Blanquette is cut into slices or discs.
Peter


&quot;Nathalie Chiva&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:Nathalie.Chiva.invalid&#64;netcourrier.com.invalid" target="_blank">Nathalie.Chiva.invalid&#64;netcourrier.com.invalid</a>&gt; wrote in
message news:<a href="mailto:45a411ps3vturin47tipj6h6life8o4vtc&#64;4ax.com..." target="_blank">45a411ps3vturin47tipj6h6life8o4vtc&#64;4ax.com...</a>
&gt; On 14 Feb 2005 13:46:26 -0800, <a href="mailto:jmeyer&#64;msg.ucsf.edu" target="_blank">jmeyer&#64;msg.ucsf.edu</a> wrote:
&gt;
&gt; &gt;
&gt; &gt;
&gt; &gt;Is there a difference between a fricassee of chicken, and a blanquette
&gt; &gt;of chicken? Both seem to go something like this:
&gt; &gt;
&gt; &gt;saute chicken pieces, but don't brown
&gt; &gt;add flour &amp; cook for a few minutes
&gt; &gt;add stock &amp; simmer for 30 minutes
&gt; &gt;strain sauce
&gt; &gt;reduce
&gt; &gt;thicken with egg yolks &amp; cream
&gt; &gt;
&gt;
&gt; Blanquette meat shouldn't be sauteed first.
&gt;
&gt; Nathalie in Switzerland

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