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#1: Coddled vs Poached

Posted on 2005-02-26 22:53:08 by CHUSMA

Hi group:

I know someone here can offer some detailed explanation as to the
difference between a coddled egg and a poached egg.
Which is better?
Which is easier to clean up?
Are coddled eggs only for special occasions?
Which variety absorbs the seasonings better?
Is egg coddling considered out-dated due to the discovery of poaching?


Yes I'm using webtv - you can make fun of me if you wish, but please
accompany your insults with helpful egg data. Thanks!

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#2: Re: Coddled vs Poached

Posted on 2005-02-26 23:50:57 by azazello

Pray Tell &lt;<a href="mailto:CHUSMA&#64;webtv.net" target="_blank">CHUSMA&#64;webtv.net</a>&gt; wrote:

&gt; I know someone here can offer some detailed explanation as to the
&gt; difference between a coddled egg and a poached egg.

Coddled eggs are either cooked for a short time in their shells in water
below the boiling point, making them the near equivalent of soft boiled
eggs, or else they are broken into a special egg coddler, which is often
a small individual lidded porcelain or ceramic egg-shaped dish that is
often buttered. The coddler is then placed in water, which again is
supposed to be below its boiling point.

Poached eggs are broken directly, or via some receptacle, into simmering
water to which vinegar is often added.

&gt; Which is better?

You tell me.

&gt; Which is easier to clean up?

Not a problem either way, as far as I am concerned.

&gt; Are coddled eggs only for special occasions?

Not any more so than soft-boiled ones.

&gt; Which variety absorbs the seasonings better?

Not much difference.

&gt; Is egg coddling considered out-dated due to the discovery of poaching?

Yes. Egg coddling is generally considered ancient and outdated, which
is also true of soft boiling eggs. Both have now been supplanted by the
recently discovered poaching, which is an ultra-modern cooking method
using nuclear power.

Victor

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#3: Re: Coddled vs Poached

Posted on 2005-02-27 00:59:49 by Margaret Suran

Victor Sack wrote:
&gt; Pray Tell &lt;<a href="mailto:CHUSMA&#64;webtv.net" target="_blank">CHUSMA&#64;webtv.net</a>&gt; wrote:
&gt;
&gt;
&gt;&gt; I know someone here can offer some detailed explanation as to the
&gt;&gt; difference between a coddled egg and a poached egg.

&lt;Much of text snipped&gt;

&gt;&gt; Is egg coddling considered out-dated due to the discovery of
&gt;&gt; poaching?
&gt;
&gt;
&gt; Yes. Egg coddling is generally considered ancient and outdated,
&gt; which is also true of soft boiling eggs. Both have now been
&gt; supplanted by the recently discovered poaching, which is an
&gt; ultra-modern cooking method using nuclear power.
&gt;
&gt; Victor

The nuclear power poachers are dreadfully expensive in the USA.
However, there are rumors that both North Korea and Iran will soon
have cheaper models available and that this is what both countries are
working on, not nuclear weapons. For all I know, all the excitement
about Iran and North Korea may just be some more outsourcing by
American Industries.

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#4: Re: Coddled vs Poached

Posted on 2005-02-27 02:03:00 by Charles Gifford

&quot;Victor Sack&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:azazello&#64;koroviev.de" target="_blank">azazello&#64;koroviev.de</a>&gt; wrote in message
news:1gsm80p.1b801vfqyk07aN%<a href="mailto:azazello&#64;koroviev.de..." target="_blank">azazello&#64;koroviev.de...</a>
&gt; Pray Tell &lt;<a href="mailto:CHUSMA&#64;webtv.net" target="_blank">CHUSMA&#64;webtv.net</a>&gt; wrote:
&gt;
&lt;snip&gt;
&gt; &gt; Which variety absorbs the seasonings better?
&gt;
&gt; Not much difference.

You are correct about all you posted Bubba Vic, except perhaps this
statement. Eggs cooked in a coddler are often seasoned (or cheesed) in the
coddler before cooking. There is almost always some butter in that coddler
too! At least in my coddlers. I think it does make a difference, but I could
be wrong too. I'm eating an omelet mit cheese later and will have 2 eggs
available for coddling for breakfast. Eggs in the coddlers, some salt and
pepper, a pat of butter and some snipped dill, then screw on the lid and
simmer to perfection. Yum! I am happy for the arrival of this idea. I did
this with smidgeon of Bordeaux once and I wish I could remember how I did
it!

Charlie

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#5: Re: Coddled vs Poached

Posted on 2005-02-27 02:32:01 by aem

Victor Sack wrote:
[snip]
&gt; Yes. Egg coddling is generally considered ancient and outdated,
which
&gt; is also true of soft boiling eggs. Both have now been supplanted by
the
&gt; recently discovered poaching, which is an ultra-modern cooking method
&gt; using nuclear power.
&gt;
Well, actually, poaching uses both nukeular and hydro power, as you
swirl the poaching water with a fork to create a little whirlpool to
drop the egg into.

Years ago in New England, diners served &quot;dropped eggs,&quot; which I think
were poached eggs that were dropped into deeper water than a poacher.
Fished them out with a sieve-type slotted spoon and plopped them onto
an English muffin.

Guilty secret: I like to tear well-buttered bread into pieces, put in
a bowl and add soft-boiled eggs, then mush the whole concoction
together. Never could get into that egg cup thing.

-aem

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#6: Re: Coddled vs Poached

Posted on 2005-02-27 03:22:11 by Wayne Boatwright

On Sat 26 Feb 2005 02:53:08p, Pray Tell wrote in rec.food.cooking:

&gt; Hi group:
&gt;
&gt; I know someone here can offer some detailed explanation as to the
&gt; difference between a coddled egg and a poached egg.

Spoiled children are coddled; eggs are poached. Ummm, or is that the other
way around? :-)

--
Wayne Boatwright
____________________________________________

Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974

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#7: Re: Coddled vs Poached

Posted on 2005-02-27 03:56:04 by Damsel

Margaret Suran &lt;<a href="mailto:margaret&#64;no.spam.for.me.invalid" target="_blank">margaret&#64;no.spam.for.me.invalid</a>&gt;, if that's her real name,
wrote:

&gt;Victor Sack wrote:
&gt;&gt;
&gt;&gt; Yes. Egg coddling is generally considered ancient and outdated,
&gt;&gt; which is also true of soft boiling eggs. Both have now been
&gt;&gt; supplanted by the recently discovered poaching, which is an
&gt;&gt; ultra-modern cooking method using nuclear power.
&gt;&gt;
&gt;&gt; Victor
&gt;
&gt;The nuclear power poachers are dreadfully expensive in the USA.
&gt;However, there are rumors that both North Korea and Iran will soon
&gt;have cheaper models available and that this is what both countries are
&gt;working on, not nuclear weapons. For all I know, all the excitement
&gt;about Iran and North Korea may just be some more outsourcing by
&gt;American Industries.

ROFLMAO!!!!!!!!

Carol
--
&quot;Years ago my mother used to say to me... She'd say,
'In this world Elwood, you must be oh-so smart or oh-so pleasant.'
Well, for years I was smart.... I recommend pleasant. You may quote me.&quot;

*James Stewart* in the 1950 movie, _Harvey_

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#8: Re: Coddled vs Poached

Posted on 2005-02-27 04:37:38 by vze23t8n

In article &lt;8%8Ud.6584$<a href="mailto:873.5984&#64;newsread3.news.pas.earthlink.net" target="_blank">873.5984&#64;newsread3.news.pas.earthlink.net</a>&gt;,
&quot;Charles Gifford&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:taxicolor&#64;earthlink.net" target="_blank">taxicolor&#64;earthlink.net</a>&gt; wrote:

&gt; You are correct about all you posted Bubba Vic, except perhaps this
&gt; statement. Eggs cooked in a coddler are often seasoned (or cheesed) in the
&gt; coddler before cooking. There is almost always some butter in that coddler
&gt; too! At least in my coddlers. I think it does make a difference, but I could
&gt; be wrong too. I'm eating an omelet mit cheese later and will have 2 eggs
&gt; available for coddling for breakfast. Eggs in the coddlers, some salt and
&gt; pepper, a pat of butter and some snipped dill, then screw on the lid and
&gt; simmer to perfection. Yum! I am happy for the arrival of this idea. I did
&gt; this with smidgeon of Bordeaux once and I wish I could remember how I did
&gt; it!

Charlie, I have some coddlers and have been wanting to try them. How
long do you simmer them? I do my poached eggs in those little cup
thingies that are suspended in water in a saucepan rather than dropping
them into vinegared boiling water. Should I time coddled eggs the same
as I do those confined poached eggs?

Priscilla
--
&quot;And what's this crap about Sodomites? It's always Sodomites this and
Sodomites that. What about us Gomorrahians? We were there too; we
deserve some mention. Sodom always gets the credit, and Gomorrah always
does the work.&quot; - JohnN in alt.religion.christian.episcopal

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#9: Re: Coddled vs Poached

Posted on 2005-02-27 16:30:43 by limey

&quot;Priscilla Ballou&quot; wrote in message &gt;

&quot;Charles Gifford&quot; wrote:
&gt;&gt; You are correct about all you posted Bubba Vic, except perhaps this
&gt;&gt; statement. Eggs cooked in a coddler are often seasoned (or cheesed) in
&gt;&gt; the
&gt;&gt; coddler before cooking. There is almost always some butter in that
&gt;&gt; coddler
&gt;&gt; too! At least in my coddlers. I think it does make a difference, but I
&gt;&gt; could
&gt;&gt; be wrong too. I'm eating an omelet mit cheese later and will have 2 eggs
&gt;&gt; available for coddling for breakfast. Eggs in the coddlers, some salt and
&gt;&gt; pepper, a pat of butter and some snipped dill, then screw on the lid and
&gt;&gt; simmer to perfection. Yum! I am happy for the arrival of this idea. I did
&gt;&gt; this with smidgeon of Bordeaux once and I wish I could remember how I did
&gt;&gt; it!
&gt;
&gt; Charlie, I have some coddlers and have been wanting to try them. How
&gt; long do you simmer them? I do my poached eggs in those little cup
&gt; thingies that are suspended in water in a saucepan rather than dropping
&gt; them into vinegared boiling water. Should I time coddled eggs the same
&gt; as I do those confined poached eggs?
&gt;
&gt; Priscilla

Here you go, Priscilla. I have coddlers, too. This description is written
by Royal Worcester, producer
of the coddlers. I think the timing is a matter of personal taste - I like
very soft cooked.

WHAT IS AN EGG CODDLER?

An egg coddler is a porcelain or pottery cup with a lid that is used
to prepare a dish called, appropriately enough, coddled eggs. The egg(s) are
broken into the buttered coddler, and seasonings are added. The coddler is
then closed with the lid and partially immersed in boiling water for a few
minutes. When the eggs are cooked to the desired firmness, the coddler is
lifted from the boiling water, the lid removed, and breakfast is served, in
a lovely decorated dish

To Use An Egg Coddler:

Start water in large pot to boiling. Butter the inside of the coddler
and the inside of the metal lid. (you can also use olive oil, cooking oil,
or non-stick spray).

Break one or two eggs (according to size of the coddler) into the cup,
and season to taste with pepper and salt.

Screw on the lid (do not screw the lid on very tightly. A loose turn
is sufficient) and stand the coddler in a pan of boiling water, taking care
that the water level comes almost up to the bottom of the lid the porcelain
body. Simmer for 7 to 8 minutes.

Remove the coddler from the water using the end of a fork/spoon
through the lifting ring or lift using oven mitts or other heat-proof
gloves. Set the coddler on a towel, or trivet (not on a cold heat-conductive
surface, such as a counter top. Using a towel and holding the lid by the
rim, not by the lifting ring, twist the lid to loosen it.

Serve at the table in the coddler.

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#10: Re: Coddled vs Poached

Posted on 2005-02-27 18:55:30 by CHUSMA

Victor wrote:
&gt;Yes. Egg coddling is generally
&gt;considered ancient and outdated, which
&gt;is also true of soft boiling eggs. Both
&gt;have now been supplanted by the
&gt;recently discovered poaching, which is
&gt;an ultra-modern cooking method using
&gt;nuclear power.

What a smarty-pants.

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#11: Re: Coddled vs Poached

Posted on 2005-02-27 20:23:13 by vze23t8n

In article &lt;<a href="mailto:38e7d8F5ljf3pU1&#64;individual.net" target="_blank">38e7d8F5ljf3pU1&#64;individual.net</a>&gt;,
&quot;limey&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:limey113&#64;yahoo.com" target="_blank">limey113&#64;yahoo.com</a>&gt; wrote:

&gt; Here you go, Priscilla. I have coddlers, too. This description is written
&gt; by Royal Worcester, producer
&gt; of the coddlers. I think the timing is a matter of personal taste - I like
&gt; very soft cooked.

[snip]

Hey, thanks! I look forward to experimenting. :-)

Priscilla (loves her eggs)
--
&quot;And what's this crap about Sodomites? It's always Sodomites this and
Sodomites that. What about us Gomorrahians? We were there too; we
deserve some mention. Sodom always gets the credit, and Gomorrah always
does the work.&quot; - JohnN in alt.religion.christian.episcopal

Report this message

#12: Re: Coddled vs Poached

Posted on 2005-02-27 23:57:05 by azazello

Pray Tell &lt;<a href="mailto:CHUSMA&#64;webtv.net" target="_blank">CHUSMA&#64;webtv.net</a>&gt; wrote:

&gt; Victor wrote:
&gt; &gt;Yes. Egg coddling is generally
&gt; &gt;considered ancient and outdated, which
&gt; &gt;is also true of soft boiling eggs. Both
&gt; &gt;have now been supplanted by the
&gt; &gt;recently discovered poaching, which is
&gt; &gt;an ultra-modern cooking method using
&gt; &gt;nuclear power.
&gt;
&gt; What a smarty-pants.

You think you deserve any better? Poaching is a criminal activity.

Victor

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#13: Re: Coddled vs Poached

Posted on 2005-02-27 23:57:07 by azazello

aem &lt;<a href="mailto:aem_again&#64;yahoo.com" target="_blank">aem_again&#64;yahoo.com</a>&gt; wrote:

&gt; Guilty secret: I like to tear well-buttered bread into pieces, put in
&gt; a bowl and add soft-boiled eggs, then mush the whole concoction
&gt; together. Never could get into that egg cup thing.

Sounds good... must imitate this one of these days. Ever used (lightly)
toasted bread for the concoction?

Victor

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#14: Re: Coddled vs Poached

Posted on 2005-02-28 00:18:41 by Rusty

On Sun, 27 Feb 2005 23:57:05 +0100, <a href="mailto:azazello&#64;koroviev.de" target="_blank">azazello&#64;koroviev.de</a> (Victor Sack)
wrote:

&gt;Pray Tell &lt;<a href="mailto:CHUSMA&#64;webtv.net" target="_blank">CHUSMA&#64;webtv.net</a>&gt; wrote:
&gt;
&gt;&gt; Victor wrote:
&gt;&gt; &gt;Yes. Egg coddling is generally
&gt;&gt; &gt;considered ancient and outdated, which
&gt;&gt; &gt;is also true of soft boiling eggs. Both
&gt;&gt; &gt;have now been supplanted by the
&gt;&gt; &gt;recently discovered poaching, which is
&gt;&gt; &gt;an ultra-modern cooking method using
&gt;&gt; &gt;nuclear power.
&gt;&gt;
&gt;&gt; What a smarty-pants.
&gt;
&gt;You think you deserve any better? Poaching is a criminal activity.
&gt;
&gt;Victor

I'm all for coddling criminals instead of poaching. ;-P


Rusty

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#15: Re: Coddled vs Poached

Posted on 2005-02-28 00:38:41 by Charles Gifford

&quot;Priscilla Ballou&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:vze23t8n&#64;verizon.net" target="_blank">vze23t8n&#64;verizon.net</a>&gt; wrote in message
news:<a href="mailto:vze23t8n-9EE8F5.14255727022005&#64;news.verizon.net..." target="_blank">vze23t8n-9EE8F5.14255727022005&#64;news.verizon.net...</a>
&gt; In article &lt;<a href="mailto:38e7d8F5ljf3pU1&#64;individual.net" target="_blank">38e7d8F5ljf3pU1&#64;individual.net</a>&gt;,
&gt; &quot;limey&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:limey113&#64;yahoo.com" target="_blank">limey113&#64;yahoo.com</a>&gt; wrote:
&gt;
&gt; &gt; Here you go, Priscilla. I have coddlers, too. This description is
written
&gt; &gt; by Royal Worcester, producer
&gt; &gt; of the coddlers. I think the timing is a matter of personal taste - I
like
&gt; &gt; very soft cooked.
&gt;
&gt; [snip]
&gt;
&gt; Hey, thanks! I look forward to experimenting. :-)
&gt;
&gt; Priscilla (loves her eggs)

Thanks from me too for saving me a bunch of typing! &lt;grin&gt;

Charlie

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#16: Re: Coddled vs Poached

Posted on 2005-02-28 00:50:27 by Charles Gifford

&quot;Victor Sack&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:azazello&#64;koroviev.de" target="_blank">azazello&#64;koroviev.de</a>&gt; wrote in message
news:1gso1x2.5oiqfhugpjncN%<a href="mailto:azazello&#64;koroviev.de..." target="_blank">azazello&#64;koroviev.de...</a>
&gt; aem &lt;<a href="mailto:aem_again&#64;yahoo.com" target="_blank">aem_again&#64;yahoo.com</a>&gt; wrote:
&gt;
&gt; &gt; Guilty secret: I like to tear well-buttered bread into pieces, put in
&gt; &gt; a bowl and add soft-boiled eggs, then mush the whole concoction
&gt; &gt; together. Never could get into that egg cup thing.
&gt;
&gt; Sounds good... must imitate this one of these days. Ever used (lightly)
&gt; toasted bread for the concoction?
&gt;
&gt; Victor

This was/is a family comfort dish going back to my earliest memories. Toast
and butter bread well, cut or tear into large pieces, and put in a large
bowl.

Poach eggs in milk until done to yer liking (for me cooked whites and runny
yolk). Place cooked eggs over the toast and add the hot poaching milk over
the eggs and toast. You probably won't want to use all the milk. I like a
lot though. Sprinkle with salt and ground black pepper. Eat it as messily as
desired.

I almost always poach my eggs in milk no matter how I use them. I like the
way the milk holds the eggs together without resorting to using the sour
taste of vinegar.

Charlie

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#17: Re: Coddled vs Poached

Posted on 2005-02-28 02:26:12 by limey

&quot;Charles Gifford&quot; wrote in message
&gt; &quot;Priscilla Ballou&quot; wrote in message
&gt;&gt; &quot;limey&quot; wrote:
&gt;&gt;
&gt;&gt; &gt; Here you go, Priscilla. I have coddlers, too. This description is
&gt; written
&gt;&gt; &gt; by Royal Worcester, producer
&gt;&gt; &gt; of the coddlers. I think the timing is a matter of personal taste - I
&gt; like
&gt;&gt; &gt; very soft cooked.
&gt;&gt;
&gt;&gt; [snip]
&gt;&gt;
&gt;&gt; Hey, thanks! I look forward to experimenting. :-)
&gt;&gt;
&gt;&gt; Priscilla (loves her eggs)
&gt;
&gt; Thanks from me too for saving me a bunch of typing! &lt;grin&gt;
&gt;
&gt; Charlie

You're welcome. Isn't cut and paste wonderful?

Dora

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#18: Re: Coddled vs Poached

Posted on 2005-02-28 03:25:06 by thisisbogus

In article &lt;1gso1x2.5oiqfhugpjncN%<a href="mailto:azazello&#64;koroviev.de" target="_blank">azazello&#64;koroviev.de</a>&gt;,
<a href="mailto:azazello&#64;koroviev.de" target="_blank">azazello&#64;koroviev.de</a> (Victor Sack) wrote:

&gt; aem &lt;<a href="mailto:aem_again&#64;yahoo.com" target="_blank">aem_again&#64;yahoo.com</a>&gt; wrote:
&gt;
&gt; &gt; Guilty secret: I like to tear well-buttered bread into pieces, put in
&gt; &gt; a bowl and add soft-boiled eggs, then mush the whole concoction
&gt; &gt; together. Never could get into that egg cup thing.
&gt;
&gt; Sounds good... must imitate this one of these days. Ever used (lightly)
&gt; toasted bread for the concoction?
&gt;
&gt; Victor

Eeew. The mental image is disgusting. Heathen that I am, I peel the
shell from the large end of the egg to about a little less than halfway
down, then eat the egg from the shell. Sometimes I'll dip a corner of
the toast in the runny yolk. Daintier..
--
-Barb, &lt;www.jamlady.eboard.com&gt; Sweet Potato Follies added 2/24/05.
&quot;I read recipes the way I read science fiction: I get to the end and
say,'Well, that's not going to happen.'&quot; - Comedian Rita Rudner,
performance at New York, New York, January 10, 2005.

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#19: Re: Coddled vs Poached

Posted on 2005-02-28 04:13:32 by aem

Charles Gifford wrote:
&gt; [snip]
&gt; Poach eggs in milk until done to yer liking (for me cooked whites and
runny
&gt; yolk). Place cooked eggs over the toast and add the hot poaching milk
over
&gt; the eggs and toast. You probably won't want to use all the milk. I
like a
&gt; lot though. Sprinkle with salt and ground black pepper. Eat it as
messily as
&gt; desired.
&gt;
&gt; I almost always poach my eggs in milk no matter how I use them. I
like the
&gt; way the milk holds the eggs together without resorting to using the
sour
&gt; taste of vinegar.

Geez, I should admit more of my guilty secrets. This one got me a good
idea I'm going to try, thanks.

-aem

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#20: Re: Coddled vs Poached

Posted on 2005-02-28 14:23:16 by Margaret Suran

Melba's Jammin' wrote:
&gt; In article &lt;1gso1x2.5oiqfhugpjncN%<a href="mailto:azazello&#64;koroviev.de" target="_blank">azazello&#64;koroviev.de</a>&gt;,
&gt; <a href="mailto:azazello&#64;koroviev.de" target="_blank">azazello&#64;koroviev.de</a> (Victor Sack) wrote:
&gt;
&gt;
&gt;&gt; aem &lt;<a href="mailto:aem_again&#64;yahoo.com" target="_blank">aem_again&#64;yahoo.com</a>&gt; wrote:
&gt;&gt;
&gt;&gt;
&gt;&gt;&gt; Guilty secret: I like to tear well-buttered bread into pieces,
&gt;&gt;&gt; put in a bowl and add soft-boiled eggs, then mush the whole
&gt;&gt;&gt; concoction together. Never could get into that egg cup thing.
&gt;&gt;
&gt;&gt; Sounds good... must imitate this one of these days. Ever used
&gt;&gt; (lightly) toasted bread for the concoction?
&gt;&gt;
&gt;&gt; Victor
&gt;
&gt;
&gt; Eeew. The mental image is disgusting. Heathen that I am, I peel
&gt; the shell from the large end of the egg to about a little less than
&gt; halfway down, then eat the egg from the shell. Sometimes I'll dip
&gt; a corner of the toast in the runny yolk. Daintier..

Barbara, Don't you put the soft boiled egg into an egg cup with the
pointy side of the shell sticking out? Then, don't you lightly tap
the top of it with your small spoon until the shell is cracked and you
can peel off about half an inch? Then, don't you take off a small
amount of the peeled egg, sprinkle a soupcon of salt on it, put a
little more salt (and white or black ground pepper if wanted) on the
remaining egg and enjoy it with buttered toast? I gave away all my
egg cups, because I stopped eating soft boiled eggs. :o( Or, perhaps
I stopped eating soft boiled eggs, because I gave away my egg cups. I
do not remember.

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#21: Re: Coddled vs Poached

Posted on 2005-02-28 17:57:02 by thisisbogus

In article &lt;<a href="mailto:cvv60311rsa&#64;news2.newsguy.com" target="_blank">cvv60311rsa&#64;news2.newsguy.com</a>&gt;, Margaret Suran
&lt;<a href="mailto:margaret&#64;no.spam.for.me.invalid" target="_blank">margaret&#64;no.spam.for.me.invalid</a>&gt; wrote:

&gt; Melba's Jammin' wrote:
&gt; &gt; In article &lt;1gso1x2.5oiqfhugpjncN%<a href="mailto:azazello&#64;koroviev.de" target="_blank">azazello&#64;koroviev.de</a>&gt;,
&gt; &gt; <a href="mailto:azazello&#64;koroviev.de" target="_blank">azazello&#64;koroviev.de</a> (Victor Sack) wrote:
&gt; &gt;
&gt; &gt;
&gt; &gt;&gt; aem &lt;<a href="mailto:aem_again&#64;yahoo.com" target="_blank">aem_again&#64;yahoo.com</a>&gt; wrote:
&gt; &gt;&gt;
&gt; &gt;&gt;
&gt; &gt;&gt;&gt; Guilty secret: I like to tear well-buttered bread into pieces,
&gt; &gt;&gt;&gt; put in a bowl and add soft-boiled eggs, then mush the whole
&gt; &gt;&gt;&gt; concoction together. Never could get into that egg cup thing.
&gt; &gt;&gt;
&gt; &gt;&gt; Sounds good... must imitate this one of these days. Ever used
&gt; &gt;&gt; (lightly) toasted bread for the concoction?
&gt; &gt;&gt;
&gt; &gt;&gt; Victor
&gt; &gt;
&gt; &gt;
&gt; &gt; Eeew. The mental image is disgusting. Heathen that I am, I peel
&gt; &gt; the shell from the large end of the egg to about a little less than
&gt; &gt; halfway down, then eat the egg from the shell. Sometimes I'll dip
&gt; &gt; a corner of the toast in the runny yolk. Daintier..
&gt;
&gt; Barbara, Don't you put the soft boiled egg into an egg cup with the
&gt; pointy side of the shell sticking out? Then, don't you lightly tap
&gt; the top of it with your small spoon until the shell is cracked and you
&gt; can peel off about half an inch? Then, don't you take off a small
&gt; amount of the peeled egg, sprinkle a soupcon of salt on it, put a
&gt; little more salt (and white or black ground pepper if wanted) on the
&gt; remaining egg and enjoy it with buttered toast? I gave away all my
&gt; egg cups, because I stopped eating soft boiled eggs. :o( Or, perhaps
&gt; I stopped eating soft boiled eggs, because I gave away my egg cups. I
&gt; do not remember.

Like I said, heathen that I am. . . . I do it like I said I do it. I
use egg cups for displaying decorated eggs sometimes.
--
-Barb, &lt;www.jamlady.eboard.com&gt; Sweet Potato Follies added 2/24/05.
&quot;I read recipes the way I read science fiction: I get to the end and
say,'Well, that's not going to happen.'&quot; - Comedian Rita Rudner,
performance at New York, New York, January 10, 2005.

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#22: Re: Coddled vs Poached

Posted on 2005-02-28 23:48:30 by azazello

Charles Gifford &lt;<a href="mailto:taxicolor&#64;earthlink.net" target="_blank">taxicolor&#64;earthlink.net</a>&gt; wrote:

&gt; Eggs in the coddlers, some salt and
&gt; pepper, a pat of butter and some snipped dill, then screw on the lid and
&gt; simmer to perfection. Yum! I am happy for the arrival of this idea. I did
&gt; this with smidgeon of Bordeaux once and I wish I could remember how I did
&gt; it!

That Bordeaux bit makes it a hybrid dish, I guess - oeufs cocotte en
meurette? A very nice idea, anyway. Here is a classic variation of
oeufs en meurette, from _Bistro Cooking_ by Patricia Wells. Might want
to coddle it, too.

Bubba Vic

Oeufs en Meurette (Poached Eggs with Red Wine Sauce)

1 carrot, peeled and cubed
2 shallots, minced
2 imported bay leaves
2 garlic cloves, minced
1 sprig of fresh rosemary or tarragon
2 cups (500 ml) full-bodied red wine, such as a Cotes-du-Rhone, Cahors,
or Madiran
8 slices French bread or any good homemade bread, cut into 1/2-inch (1.5
cm) thick slices, crusts removed, cut into even 3-inch (7.5 cm)
rounds with a biscuit cutter
2 garlic cloves, peeled and halved
1 tablespoon (1/2 ounce; 15 g) unsalted butter, softened
1 tablespoon all-purpose flour
2 tablespoons distilled vinegar
8 extra-large eggs, at room temperature
Salt and freshly ground black pepper

1. In a medium-size nonreactive saucepan, combine the carrot, shallots,
bay leaves, minced garlic, rosemary, and wine over high heat. Boil
until reduced by half, about 10 minutes. Strain the wine; discard the
vegetables and herbs. (This step can be done well in advance and the
wine refrigerated.)

2. Preheat the broiler.

3. Toast the bread on both sides until golden brown. Remove from the
oven and immediately rub on both sides with a cut garlic clove.

4. Complete the red wine sauce: On a plate, mash the butter and flour
together to form a well-blended paste (beurre manie). In a small
nonreactive saucepan, bring the reduced wine to a simmer. Carefully
whisk in the butter and flour paste, a little at a time, until the sauce
is lightly thickened and glossy. Remove from the heat and keep warm.

5. In two shallow 10-inch (25.5 cm) pans, bring 3 inches (7.5 cm) of
water and 1 tablespoon of vinegar to a boil. Turn off the heat and
immediately break 4 eggs directly into the water in each pan, carefully
opening the shells close to the water's surface, so the eggs slip into
the water in one piece. Immediately cover the pans with tight-fitting
lids to retain the heat. Do not disturb the pans. Allow the eggs to
cook for three minutes before lifting the lids. The eggs are ready when
the whites are opaque and the yolks are covered with a thin, translucent
layer of white.

6. While the eggs cook, place 2 toasts (croutons) on each of 4 warmed
plates. Using a flat, slotted spoon, carefully lift the eggs from the
water and place on top of the croutons. Spoon the wine sauce all
around, season with salt and pepper to taste, and serve immediately,
with additional toasted bread, if desired.

Yield: 4 servings

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#23: Re: Coddled vs Poached

Posted on 2005-03-02 00:11:07 by Charles Gifford

&quot;Victor Sack&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:azazello&#64;koroviev.de" target="_blank">azazello&#64;koroviev.de</a>&gt; wrote in message
news:1gspuo4.1ys4nseiss34oN%<a href="mailto:azazello&#64;koroviev.de..." target="_blank">azazello&#64;koroviev.de...</a>
&gt; Charles Gifford &lt;<a href="mailto:taxicolor&#64;earthlink.net" target="_blank">taxicolor&#64;earthlink.net</a>&gt; wrote:
&gt;
&gt; &gt; Eggs in the coddlers, some salt and
&gt; &gt; pepper, a pat of butter and some snipped dill, then screw on the lid and
&gt; &gt; simmer to perfection. Yum! I am happy for the arrival of this idea. I
did
&gt; &gt; this with smidgeon of Bordeaux once and I wish I could remember how I
did
&gt; &gt; it!
&gt;
&gt; That Bordeaux bit makes it a hybrid dish, I guess - oeufs cocotte en
&gt; meurette? A very nice idea, anyway. Here is a classic variation of
&gt; oeufs en meurette, from _Bistro Cooking_ by Patricia Wells. Might want
&gt; to coddle it, too.
&gt;
&gt; Bubba Vic
&gt;
&gt; Oeufs en Meurette (Poached Eggs with Red Wine Sauce)
&lt;snip&gt;

Holy crap Bubba Vic! This sounds heavenly! I have not made anything like
this, but your post has nudged my memory enough that I remember poaching
eggs in red wine for use in some recipe many years ago. I can taste the
eggs, but I cannot remember the recipe or anymore about it. I can't even
remember if it was French or Spanish (could it be a Graham Kerr dish?). I
hate not being able to remember things! Getting old has no value that I can
see except not being dead. Anyway, thanks for pointing out this recipe for
me. I have this book and wonder why I don't recall it! I gotta read it
again. Alan Zelt has the book too and has pointed out other recipes I've
missed in it.

Charlie, in need of coddling

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